Regrowing Vegetable Scraps

How to Simply Regrow Vegetable Scraps

Even if you can guess how to regrow vegetable scraps, you may be surprised at just how much of your grocery list you can resurrect from odds and ends! Whether you’re on a budget, or just happen to love this awesome idea, our easy guide to regrowing veggie scraps is your go-to for propagating your pantry.

 

How to regrow Romaine lettuce

How to regrow Romaine lettuce
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Anyone can learn how to regrow Romaine lettuce. It’s astonishingly easy and the results are surefire.

First, get a nice, healthy head of Romaine from your local farmer’s market. After you’ve eaten the leaves, put the stump in a bowl filled with about half an inch of water. Over the next few days, store the container on a cool window sill, re-filling as necessary to keep the stump sitting in half an inch of water. It usually takes less than a week for new roots and leaves to shoot out of the “dead” end! Once you see them, you’re ready to transplant your live, growing Romaine to a real home. A pot of soil or an indoor garden are ideal environments.

 

How to regrow green onion

How to regrow green onion
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Scallions, also known as Green Onions, are another vegetable that you can regrow again and again. Put the end of the scallion, roots down, in a glass. Just like you did with the romaine, fill the glass with a little water. Make sure the roots are covered, but leave the tops free to breathe! In a week, there will be three to four inches of new scallion growing out of those old roots. At that point, feel free to transplant them into a pot or soil patch.

 

How to regrow ginger

How to regrow ginger
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Plant some ginger, buds-up, in healthy soil. Water it regularly and leave it somewhere sunny. In just a few weeks, you’ll have new ginger! Voila! Your garden is a little bigger.

 

How to regrow celery

How to regrow celery
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There’s a pattern among plants that you might be catching onto: if it has an end, it might just re-grow! Celery is no exception. Like Romaine and scallions, celery ends will produce new shoots and roots when left in shallow water and exposed to sunlight. Try it! Once it’s sprouted and transplanted to the soil, your new-old celery will likely grow up to be as strong and delicious as its store-bought ancestor.

Whether or not you’re a garden enthusiast, you’ve got to admit that these are pretty cool kitchen hacks.

 

Sources:
http://www.takepart.com
http://www.trueactivist.com

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